Protein For 2 Meals A Day, Erections, Functional Dyspepsia | THRR112

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News topic du jour:

Democratic Senators call on messaging apps WhatsApp, Telegram, and Signal to address “misinformation”

Obesity in late adolescence and incident type 1 diabetes in young adulthood

 


Podcast Questions:

1. 2 Meals A Day [12:05]

Ryan says:

Huge fan of sacred cow. I like eating 2 meals a day but after listening to book I’m trying to increase my protein to 180 to 200 grams a day. I’m 6’1 210 lbs. Is it beneficial to eat 90 grams in each meal or is that two much for my body to process correctly for optimal absorption? Should I spread it out? Thanks

2. Putative blood flow issues [15:40]

Charles says:

Hi Robb and Nicki, long-time listener here. I have been following Robb since I was 18, almost ten years ago! Thank you for your work.

Background: 6 feet tall, male, 142 lbs, 28 years old. Lenient paleo diet for almost 10 years supplemented with 0.5-1 packet LMNT daily depending on weather/exercise load, generally great sleep hygiene, devote a lot of effort to getting in the sun every day, weights 2x/week, 45 min bike ride at least 2x/week. Recent blood work came back excellent (just the standard LDL, HDL, Hem A1C, Vit D, thyroid stimulating hormone, hepatic enzymes). I do seem to have issues with circulation though, which I think may be related to the problem I describe below. My extremities go numb easily, and when it’s cold I have a few finger tips that lose color/sensitivity for extended periods of time after the others have returned to normal temperature.

The problem: My erections have decreased in strength noticeably in the past two years. The problem usually isn’t so severe that it prevents sex (though a few times it has), but it certainly decreases its quality for both parties involved on a regular basis.

Potentially relevant circumstances surrounding the problem: A little over two years ago (when the problem began) I ended a bad relationship, started a new **amazing** one, moved twice, had a very bad car accident, had a very bad cycling accident, lost my grandmother, helped my mother through a traumatic incident, etc. I’d like to point out that this was Winter-Summer 2020, need I say more? It was a whirlwind of a year. I dealt with it in healthy ways (amping up the exercise and protein consumption) and unhealthy ways (picking up a 1-2 drinks before dinner habit that I’ve since decreased to just on weekends; this decrease happened 6 months ago).

Should I talk to a therapist instead of sending this in to a podcast? Probably, but why not both? I’m hoping you and Nicki might be able to connect some dots I haven’t.

3. Functional Dyspepsia [21:36]

Cristi says:

I love your show and the dynamics between the two of you. I’d love to join “the rebellion” when I can afford it. What do we know in natural health about “functional dyspepsia?” I just had an upper endoscopy to diagnose the cause of a burning sensation in my stomach just under my right ribcage usually right after eating/while eating that seems to respond to an amount of food rather than any particular food. Before this, the gastro had me do a stool test that was negative for H. Pylori. They took biopsies during the upper endo, but the doctor says he doesn’t expect to find anything. He said he saw irritation in the stomach lining and it was probably caused by “functional dyspepsia” which was an imbalance of acid in the stomach. He said the causes of this could be different things, including stress (which I admittedly have a lot of, but I do what I can to control it) and that otherwise, causes were unknown, but that I could just take Pepsid! How long? Oh, maybe forever…Needless to say, I’m not doing that. SO, if all I know is that the acid is “imbalanced,” how do I balance it? At the risk of making this too much longer, my diet, exercise, and supplement regimen are all along the lines of what paleo-centric gurus recommend, so none of the other causes of this “disfunction” (NSAID use, fried/unhealthy fat foods, alcohol excess) make sense. I’m not celiac, but I don’t eat gluten and dairy because they just don’t feel great. I’m thinking of continuing to take probiotics and add a functional medicine supplement with aloe, licorice root, marshmallow root, NAD etc. to maybe calm the irritation? My only other thought is that maybe I’ve been taking too much of a natural allergy supplement that has quercitin (400 mg per two pills) -3 pills twice a day-but I doubt that’s it, and after stopping it for five days before this procedure as they required, I really noticed my allergies kicking in. The problem is, I’m 5’5, 118-120, and closer to 118 with what I’m able to eat without feeling discomfort. I have to stop before I’m satisfied completely. I wake up at night hungry, and I can’t go back to sleep, and I know 118 is too light for me. I weight train 3X per week, and I’m active all of the other days. I’m a highschool teacher, so I’m not really sedentary, either. I’m pretty low carb with starchy carbs (about a cup of sweet potato or rice) only included at dinner. THANK YOU!

 

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Transcript:

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Nicki: It’s time to make your health an act of rebellion. We’re tackling personalized nutrition, metabolic flexibility, resilient aging, and answering your diet and lifestyle questions. This is the only show with the bold aim to help one million people liberate themselves from the sick care system. You’re listening to The Healthy Rebellion Radio.

Nicki: The contents of this show are for entertainment and educational purposes only. Nothing in this podcast should be considered medical advice. Please consult your licensed and credentialed functional medicine practitioner before embarking on any health, dietary, or fitness change. Warning, when Robb gets passionate, he’s been known to use the occasional expletive. If foul language is not your thing, if it gets your britches in a bunch, well, there’s always Disney plus.

Nicki: Good morning. And welcome back to another episode of The Healthy Rebellion Radio. How are you today, hubs?

Robb: Good. You had me have drinkus interruptus.

Nicki: Drinkus interruptus is you’re bringing the mug to the mouth and I ask you a question.

Robb: Exactly that is drinkus interruptus.

Nicki: Hope you all are doing well. We are in another week of rain and the beautiful Northwest Montana territory.

Robb: You’re so full of shit.

Nicki: We are itching for some sun, getting very little. I don’t know what we need to do about it, but…

Robb: Move. Again.

Nicki: This is the reality. No, we’re not moving. We are here, just we’re ready for the sun. What else?

Robb: I’ve got nothing.

Nicki: All right. Let’s see here. Inside the health rebellion community, we do have… Well, as I mentioned before, our book club just started last week, so we’re in the middle of The Book of Joy. Anybody can join at any time and catch up. It’s a great, great read, people are really enjoying it. We also have another several upcoming events led by rebels this summer. This week we are in the middle of a seven day breathwork challenge, on June 22nd we have a food preservation workshop, and then the whole month of July we will be doing a rucking challenge. So lots of fun stuff coming up inside the healthy rebellion community. If you’d like to get in on any of that, be sure to join. And you can do that at join.thehealthrebellion.com.

Nicki: Let’s see. I’m trying to think if there’s any other updates or newsworthy items. No.

Robb: I don’t think so. Lots of good activity in the rebellion and all that good stuff. So, yeah.

Nicki: Okay. What do you have for us for a news topic today?

Robb: Two news topics. One, the title is “democratic senators call on messaging apps WhatsApp, Telegram, and Signal to address ‘misinformation’.” And I don’t want people to get hung up, so the title is democratic senators. There are Republican Senator in this too, so don’t… God, people just freak out. Oh my God, my team’s being called out. Well, both teams suck and… They really suck. So I don’t even know quite… It seems so obvious that this is such a terrible idea that I’m not really… I’m hesitant in some ways to even bring it up, because well obviously it’s a bad idea. These folks, in addition to the already onerous process of every single thing on social media being somehow subjected to the scrutiny of “fact checking” and frequently it just being flat ass wrong. The fact checkers are not actually subject matter experts on various topics. And this is particularly germane to health, medicine…

Nicki: And the fact checkers are frequently not objective. They are…

Robb: That’s a whole other side. I’m just talking about basic competence. They’re not even in the realm of having competence. Then we get to the whole regulatory capture deal and who’s funding them and all that stuff. And now in addition to that, there are folks in our illustrious governmental structure that want our messaging apps to be regulated similarly. So that whatever Nicki and I are sharing, or I’m sharing with someone else, or all of y’all are sharing between each other, has some sort of regulatory oversight. So it’s like, “Hey Robb, that thing you mentioned, wasn’t quite accurate. And you should really think about modifying your position on that.”

Nicki: Hey, Robb, when you said that cows are good for the environment, that wasn’t quite accurate and you need to start saying that cows are bad for the environment and that…

Robb: Meat causes cancer.

Nicki: Yes.

Robb: And plant-based is the only one true way to address health, environmental, and ethical issues. It’s a beautiful illustration of where this drives off a cliff. And so I just want to put this on folks’ radars. And it’s ironic, there’s a sub tagline, particularly in Hispanic communities. So they’re really going to target Hispanic communities in this push to make sure that those folks get this right. And a big part of the reason for that is Hispanic communities are a massive swing vote one way or the other. They’re an interesting mix in that Hispanic voters can go conservative or more progressive based off of a variety of factors. They tend to be more family based, tend to be more Catholic oriented and whatnot. So have a conservative base to it. But also interestingly tend to have an openness to more socialized healthcare and stuff like that. So, interesting demographic really that is growing and is really important to make sure that those people have the correct thoughts.

Robb: So I just wanted to put this on everybody’s radar, and there are some actionable steps towards addressing this, which the article talks about a little bit. So I just wanted to mention that and put on the radar, again.

Nicki: Okay.

Robb: The other piece, really quickly, is “obesity in late adolescence and incident type one diabetes in young adulthood.” This is a study that effectively looked at body mass index, which is not a perfect measure, but it also appears to be highly predictive of the autoimmune complication of type one diabetes. And it’s interesting, within the type one diabetic community, people of historically, and I think in many regards rightfully, gotten rather prickly when people say, “Well, how did your kid get diabetes?” He or she was eating poorly. And that’s not really always remotely the issue.

Robb: This autoimmune situation can be precipitated from vaccines, from viral infections, from acts of God. And also there are some linkages with dietary factors, particularly gluten and dairy are biggies in this. But what was interesting is that just simply having a higher body mass index started correlating really, really strongly with the subsequent development of type one diabetes. And there’s a lot of different mechanistic potentials here. There could absolutely be alterations in the gut microbiome, in intestinal permeability, in systemic inflammation. And this is another one of the reasons why the folks that are in this healthy at any size camp, I really think that the vast majority of people start here with some good intentions, but I’m continually flabbergasted at how this messaging is failing people. And it’s not helping them. And I think the flip side of this is that nobody needs to be harassed and harangued for health issues. And if you’re overweight or whatever, none of that’s appropriate. None of that’s okay. But just lying to people that, “Hey, man,” you know…

Nicki: There’s just going to be a lot of suffering, unnecessary suffering, if the messaging is…

Robb: Your house is on fire, but you’re okay here.

Nicki: You’re okay. Yeah.

Robb: Yeah, yeah. And so I think that this is important stuff that we just have to push back on. And I’ve been, frankly, kind of reticent to push back on it that hard because it’s super easy to get oneself canceled and called a bigot and all kinds of other things. But it is reaching a point where I’m watching folks in my community, people who got their start basically with me, who are really advocating for this, diet culture is evil and horrible and just eat whatever you want. And you’re beautiful, and maybe you are beautiful, but you also may be unhealthy.

Robb: And if that’s what you want to do, that’s fine. But if you arrive there because you ostensibly went to a “health expert” and that health expert gave you garbage advice, then somebody else like me needs to do something different so that there’s at least the option that folks know that well, little Jimmy and little Jane, if they’re super overweight in childhood, it doesn’t bode well for them the rest of their lives. And maybe we could get out in front of this. Maybe we could do something that improves their health now and their health later and their quality of life. And if you want to get all call me on it, then it’s going to be a lesser drag on our collective social infrastructure and whatnot. This is one of these things that good health really should be an easy bipartisan thing. If you’re a real pull yourself up by your bootstraps, rugged individual, then you want to be as healthy as you can so that you’re not a drag on your family, your community and all the rest of that. And then if you’re a good little goose stepping socialist, then you should want to be as healthy as you possibly can so that you negatively impact the health infrastructure of the world as minimally as possible. So there you got that. That’s probably the whole episode. We’ll just wrap that up there and call it good.

Nicki: Okay. There we go. And we’ll link to both of those in the show notes. And, as always, The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our salty AF electrolyte company LMNT. It’s officially summer, officially by the calendar, not necessarily by the-

Robb: Is it really?

Nicki: …glowing orb in the sky that is not here in Northwest Montana.

Robb: I thought it was still later June.

Nicki: Oh, June 21st?

Robb: Yeah.

Nicki: Well, I usually think of June as summer.

Robb: Yeah, that’s fair enough.

Nicki: But you’re right. You’re right. Solstice, I think, is the official, official thing.

Robb: Look at me, splitting hairs.

Nicki: Look at you. Yes. Anyway, summer usually means warmer weather, more time outside, and in an increased need for electrolytes. So stay hydrated during all your favorite summer activities with LMNT. All the electrolytes you need and none of the sugar or the other crap that you don’t. And remember grapefruit salt is back for a limited time. You can grab yours as well as any other delicious LMNT flavors at drinklmnt.com/robb. That’s drinklmnt.com/robb. And it is pronounced element, not elementy. Just a PSA.

Robb: There you have it. That’s how we tell the in versus the out crowd. Always.

Nicki: Yeah. People are like, “Oh, I tried some of that elementy and it’s so good.”

Robb: And then we usually reply, “Yes, element is quite outstanding.”

Nicki: All right, we’ve got three questions today. The first one is from Ryan on two meals a day. Ryan says, “I’m a huge fan of sacred cow, and I like eating two meals a day, but after listening to the book I’m trying to increase my protein to 180 to 200 grams a day. I’m six foot one and 210 pounds. Is it beneficial to eat 90 grams in each meal, or is that too much for my body to process correctly for optimal absorption? Should I spread it out?”

Robb: So the issue isn’t absorption. You’ll absorb that just fine. The whole notion of you can’t absorb or benefit from more than 30 grams of protein in a meal is completely bunk, and it’s been… Lane Norton, Gabrielle Lion, some of the folks that are good protein experts have done great breakdowns on that. But the opportunity that’s being missed here is that the more frequently that we get above about 25 to 30 grams of protein, in a meal, whole protein, I’m assuming animal-

Nicki: Not shakes.

Robb: …protein. Not that, well-

Nicki: Must have a face and a soul.

Robb: Face and soul, kill it, bring it into your person. God, that was good. Good material.

Nicki: A good line that people will remember if they ever attended one of Robb’s CrossFit nutrition seminars.

Robb: Yeah. Yeah. But, no, a shake can work. Whey protein can work, but what we need is enough branch chain amino acids, specifically lysine, or not lysine, but the anabolic signaling branch chain amino acids, so that we are offsetting catabolism, basically. So two meals and a snack, something crazy like three meals, the basic thing is if you are really rocking the two meals a day thing, it’s totally fine, but…

Nicki: So better for anabolic signaling if you’re having multiple…

Robb: A third meal. Yeah.

Nicki: Yeah, a third meal above 30 grams.

Robb: And this is where it gets a little interesting. If you really wanted to… If your goal was maximal muscle gain, maybe that four to six small meals, each meal having 25, 30 gram, just enough protein to hit the anabolic signaling, but then you get that multiple times per day, then you could make the case at that that’s probably a good thing. I suspect that there’s probably some sort of a U curve on that and it may start flattening out at some point, but this is where, to build muscle and also to maintain muscle, although maintaining muscle is easier than building it, but some frequency of anabolic signaling from physical activity, that is specifically resistance training, and then also just dietary intake of protein that is sufficient to stimulate that anabolic response. So I would make the case, Ryan, that a third meal, two meals and a snack, something like that, if that works-

Nicki: The snack being 30 grams of protein.

Robb: Yeah. Yeah. And then maybe you could shave maybe 40 grams of protein, something like that, so you could shave a little bit out of both meals and then just have your small meal, small snack, primarily protein at some other point. Just to goose that anabolic signaling-

Nicki: Canned tuna.

Robb: Yeah. Canned tuna, there you go. Yep.

Nicki: All right.

Robb: I could think of-

Nicki: Other things that might be tastier and easier.

Robb: …a lot of other things more enjoyable than a can of tuna.

Nicki: It comes in handy sometimes.

Robb: It does.

Nicki: All right, our next question is from Charles on blood flow issues. “Hi, Robb and Nicki. Long time listener here. I have been following Robb since I was 18, almost 10 years ago. Thank you for your work. Background: six feet tall, male, 142 pounds, 28 years old. Lenient paleo diet for almost 10 years, supplemented with a half to one packet of LMNT daily, depending on weather and exercise load. Generally great sleep hygiene. Devote a lot of effort to getting in the sun every day. Weights twice a week, 45 minute bike ride at least twice a week. Recent blood work came back excellent. Just the standard LDL, HDL, hem A1C, vitamin D, thyroid stimulating hormone, hepatic enzymes. I do seem to have issues with circulation, though, which I think may be related to the problem I describe below. My extremities go numb easily, and when it’s cold, I have a few fingertips that lose color and sensitivity for extended periods of time after the others have returned to normal temperature.” So that sounds like Raynaud’s right there.

Nicki: Okay. But here’s the problem. “My problem: my erections have decreased in strength noticeably in the past two years. The problem usually isn’t so severe that it prevents sex, although a few times it has, but it certainly decreases its quality for both parties involved on a regular basis. Potentially relevant circumstances surrounding the problem: a little over two years ago, when the problem began, I ended a bad relationship, started a new amazing one, moved twice, had a very bad car accident, had a very bad cycling accident, lost my grandmother, helped my mother through a traumatic incident, etc. I’d like to point out that this was winter through summer of 2020. Need I say more? It was a whirlwind of a year. I dealt with it in healthy ways, amping up the exercise and protein consumption, and unhealthy ways, picking up one to two drinks before dinner habit that I’ve since decreased just on the weekends. This decrease happened six months ago. Should I talk to a therapist instead of sending this into a podcast? Probably, but why not both? I’m hoping you guys might be able to connect some dots that I haven’t.”

Robb: As Luis says, ¿Por qué no los dos?

Nicki: ¿Por qué no los dos?

Robb: Man, just getting very mechanistic about this, there’s… The Raynaud’s thing is definitely interesting, the cold hands and feet, really significant response to temperature changes, it’s a pretty big deal. We’ve seen significant improvements in people, lower carb, gluten free. Raynaud’s is-

Nicki: It could have autoimmune component to it, right?

Robb: Yeah, it seems to have an autoimmune piece to it. So some sort of carnivore-esque autoimmune paleo seems like a good thing. Mechanistically, on the erection side, the testosterone levels and then nitric oxide production are biggies. And this is where eating some beets, having some sort of beet juice powder, it legitimately seems to improve nitric oxide release. This is part of what is facilitated with things like Viagra and Tadalafil and things like that, which can also address those issues.

Robb: I would definitely get just baseline total testosterone, free testosterone, estrogen, estradiol, sex hormone, binding globulin, get a really good functional look at testosterone levels to just see how things are working there. Because, interestingly, the testosterone status also influences the nitric oxide production, which is part of the vasodilation process of having an erection. And flip side for women, there’s a vasodilated process that is important on their side of the sexual function story in this whole thing. Which many people don’t realize that women also will benefit sexually from small amounts of Viagra and whatnot, because of the improved blood flow and mucus production and all that fun stuff, improved sensitivity, but anyway. Side note.

Nicki: So everybody needs to go to the farmer’s market and get beets.

Robb: Get some beets, make some borscht, and get after it. But at a baseline, again, I think I would look into maybe addressing the basic autoimmune stuff with some sort of an elimination diet to get a baseline. Sounds like he was pretty good, but you just never know when people…

Nicki: Well, in those couple of, or the drink, I’m wondering is that beer? Is it wine? If it is beer, again, that gluten piece can be huge for the autoimmune-

Robb: Can be a biggie. And the alcohol near bedtime can absolutely crush testosterone levels, just crater them. So another piece to look at with this. But I think looking at some sort of addressing that autoimmune potentiality. I’m thinking, well, that gets out in the weeds. But address that autoimmune potentiality. Get some basic blood work to establish what testosterone levels are. As part of the diet, make sure you’re getting some beets couple of times a week, maybe even a little dose of that daily, and the beets juice powder that are in some of these pre-workouts. You don’t need the caffeine and all the other squirreliness in there, but it enhances nitric oxide production. The stuff is legit, so that could definitely be helpful.

Robb: And then if none of that really addresses things to the degree that you might want, then something like Tadalafil or Viagra or something like that could be potentially helpful. But given he’s not that old-

Nicki: He’s 28.

Robb: …he’s 28. Yeah, we should be able to get out in front of this in a really significant way by just making sure that testosterone levels are on point. Improve the intake of some of the nitric oxide releasing precursors like in beets and all that stuff.

Nicki: Cool. All right. Our third and final question this week is from Christy on functional dyspepsia. Christy says, “I love your show and the dynamics between the two of you. I’d love to join the rebellion when I can afford it. What do we know in natural health about functional dyspepsia? I just had an upper endoscopy to diagnose the cause of a burning sensation in my stomach just under my right ribcage, usually right after eating or while eating, that seems to respond to an amount of food rather than any particular food. Before this, the gastro had me do a stool test that was negative for H pilori. They took biopsies during the upper endo, but the doctor says he doesn’t expect to find anything. He said he saw irritation in the stomach lining, and it was probably caused by functional dyspepsia, which was an imbalance of acid in the stomach. He said the causes of this could be different things, including stress, which I admittedly have a lot of, but I do what I can to control it, and that otherwise causes were unknown, but that I could just take Pepcid. How long? Oh, maybe forever. Needless to say, I’m not doing that.

Nicki: “So if all I know is that the acid is imbalanced, how do I balance it? At the risk of making this too much longer, my diet exercise and supplement regimen are all along the lines of what paleo-centric gurus recommend, so none of the other causes of this dysfunction like NSAID use, fried or unhealthy fatty foods, or alcohol excess makes sense. I’m not celiac, but I don’t eat gluten and dairy because they just don’t feel great. I’m thinking of continuing to take probiotics and add a functional medicine supplement with aloe, licorice root, marshmallow root, NAD, etc., to maybe calm the irritation.

Nicki: “My only other thought is that maybe I’ve been taking too much of a natural allergy supplement, that is Quercetin 400 milligrams per two pills, three pills twice a day, but I doubt that’s it. And after stopping it for five days before this procedure, as they required, I really noticed my allergies kicking in. The problem is I’m five foot five, 118 to 120 pounds, and closer to one 18 with what I’m able to eat without feeling discomfort. I have to stop before I’m satisfied completely. I wake up at night hungry and I can’t go back to sleep. And I know 118 pounds is too light for me. I weight train three times per week and I’m active all the other days. I’m a high school teacher, so I’m not really sedentary either. Pretty low carb with starchy carbs, about a cup of sweet potato or rice, only included at dinner. Thank you.”

Robb: Man. There’s so many different angles that could be tackled on this. There could just be a structural issue, although when Christy related this, she said that they saw irritation in the stomach. Usually when you hear something like this, it’s a valve not closing, and so we’re getting some reflux up into the esophagus. And it sounds like that’s not really what the case was here. That it’s actually some issues in the gut. Then I start thinking about mucus production in the stomach, which normally protects the gut. And if we don’t have enough of that, or the right consistency, or you could have a dysbiotic situation with the wrong type of bacteria growing in that, then it allows the stomach acid to come in contact with the tissue and then it can damage it.

Robb: I kind of feel like there just needs to be a little bit more of a deeper functional medicine dive on this. There’s not that many Chris Cressers out there, but there are some very, very good folks. But I would poke around and try to find, maybe like Dr. Rusho, someone like that that is really a gut expert. And just go a little bit deeper on this because there’s, there’s something else amiss here. And Christy’s ticking most of the boxes, she’s doing the standard diligence, and not really getting the response that we would expect out of this. So there’s probably something else going on here. Could be a deal where she just needs to eat frequent, small meals throughout the day. It sounds like there’s some sort of a size threshold, worsens the situation. Yeah.

Nicki: The fact that she wakes up at night hungry, you used to always say in the seminars, if that’s the case, look to your previous meal and you probably didn’t have enough fat. Would you…?

Robb: Could be the fat and protein, but she’s just having a problem eating enough.

Nicki: Right.

Robb: So there’s just so many different ways you could go after this. It sounds like she eats really well, but could we do a really hard elimination diet? Even going carnivore? Yeah, that could be a reset, and see how you do. There may still be some type of irritant that is consistently in there. Maybe it’s starch itself. It doesn’t sound like she has that much, but…

Nicki: Yeah, but the sweet potato or rice at dinner doesn’t sound like it’s a lot, but…

Robb: It could be it. This is again where having a little bit of outside eyeballs on this and then moving forward. It would just be interesting to think about any other dysbiotic potentialities using… And it’s always a little spooky because you do something, she’s already lighter than what she would like to be. So recommending something really low carb or carnivore or something like that is a little bit hairball because people tend to lose weight on those protocols. But those are some of the things that one could do to just try to get back to a baseline. We’ve had people in the rebellion that did the seven day carb test, did really poorly with carbs, did a carnivore reset for six months, started reintroducing carbs, they had lost weight, they started strength training, and then their carb tolerance dramatically improved and GI problems were better.

Robb: Which I don’t know that’s going to happen with everybody. Some people, there’s this concern about removing carbohydrates and starch and fermentable fiber that’s going to alter the gut microbiome in a way that we end up in this cul-de-sac where we’re trapped in low carb and keto. I think maybe that does happen, but I’ve also seen the flip side of that where people actually are able to eat broader things later because they just generally got more metabolically healthy. So I guess the thoughts there are, maybe try a pretty strict reset diet.

Nicki: Elimination diet.

Robb: Elimination diet. Maybe that means carnivore. I don’t know, again, it’s dependent on what she’s game for. And it would be great if she had somebody helping to steward her specifically through this stuff. And then the other thing is a deep dive on any other potential gut microbiota issues that could be driving this. And again, I’m assuming that this isn’t some sort of a structural issue that the problem is her esophagus getting irritated from the sphincters basically not working properly. And then sometimes the main remedy in that situation is small meals, sleeping with a slant pillow to keep you upright a little bit so that you’re not allowing the acid to go up into your esophagus and whatnot, but-

Nicki: It doesn’t sound like it’s an esophageal issue. It’s more of a stomach situation.

Robb: Yeah.

Nicki: All right, christy, hopefully something in there can help point you in the right direction. Let’s see here. That’s our final question this week. Cool. Any other parting thoughts, hubs?

Robb: Praying for sun.

Nicki: Praying for sun.

Robb: Yep.

Nicki: Yep. Hope you all have sun wherever you are, because it is June.

Robb: They do have sun. They just may have clouds between them and the sun.

Nicki: Right. Well, thank you guys for joining us. As always be sure to check out our sponsor LMNT at drinklmnt.com/rob. And we’ll see you next time. You can always submit your questions at robwolf.com and be sure to join us in health rebellion for all of our upcoming summer fun at join.thehealthyrebellion.com and we’ll see you next time.

Robb: Bye, everybody.

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