This IG Account Shares Interesting Historical Facts The World Should Not Forget (120 Pics)

This IG Account Shares Interesting Historical Facts The World Should Not Forget (120 Pics)

Carl Sagan once said, “You have to know the past to understand the present.” While some may think that history is just a whole lot of dates and names, it’s actually much more than that. In fact, it’s the little details that help you to get a deeper knowledge of a certain era or event, and let you figure out why things happened the way they did.

If you’re always searching for new tidbits of information and find yourself trying to expand your mental horizons, we’ve got you covered. Just take a look at this Instagram account dedicated to making history more interesting one day at a time. From Elvis Presley to Shrek the Sheep, this page will help you put things into context.

Bored Panda has collected some of the best facts posted by the account, so continue scrolling and make sure to upvote the ones that were new to you. Also, be sure to check out our previous posts about weird history facts here and here.

#1

In 1955, Rosa Parks gets arrested for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. Parks’ act of disobedience led to the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The boycott went on for more than a year as African Americans walked or carpooled to work and school. The bus company suffered greatly, since African Americans were 70 percent of their riders. In November of 1956, the US Supreme Court ruled the bus segregation as a violation of the equal protection clause of the 14th amendment. This called off the protest and Rosa Parks became one of the first to ride the newly desegregated buses.

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#2

In 1957, Elvis Presley gets drafted to the United States Army. Despite thousands of Presley’s fans asking for him to be spared, Elvis still joined the army. Presley’s entrance in the army was widely praised as he was seen as a model for all young Americans. Presley had a massive influence on society. When he received his polio shot by an army doctor on television, vaccination rates increased from 2 to 85 percent by the time he was discharged in 1960.

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#3

In 1692, the first people are accused of witchcraft as part of the Salem Witch Trials. The trials began when two little girls began having fits and a doctor diagnosed them of suffering the effects of witchcraft. The community then began accusing people of witchcraft, mostly middle aged women. As of result over 150 people were arrested and around 20 people were put to death. The trials finally ended a year later when the governor realized that many innocent lives were being lost.

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#4

In 2010, Miep Gies dies. Gies was the last survivor who helped hide Anne Frank and her family during World War II. Despite Gies’ heroic contributions trying to save the Franks from the Nazis, the Franks were captured. However, Gies protected Anne Frank’s notebooks that described Frank’s experience in her 2 year hideout. These experiences were later published as “Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl.” The diary became one of the most widely read book on the Holocaust.

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#5

On July 15, 1878, Anna Coleman Ladd graces the world with her presence. Coleman is credited for being the god-mother of Anaplastology. She spent most of her days in Red Cross tents, experiencing first hand the gruesome nature of one of the bloodiest battles of human history during the Battle of the Somme. Coleman assisted soldiers who were battered beyond recognition, sculpting face masks in an attempt to restore them to their former selves. She molded pieces from galvanized copper, tin foil, and human hair by hand. Coleman provided the soldiers of WWI with an invaluable gift, a reflection they could come to terms with.

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#6

In the 1930s, London parents would use the “baby cage” to hang their babies out the window. Parents would do this because of the conception that babies need to be “aired” to “renew and purify the blood.” Therefore, responding to a lack of outdoor space, some London communities began installing “baby cages.” Eventually due to the growing safety concerns of babies in the 20th century the custom ended.

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#7

In 1934, Bonnie and Clyde are shot to death by police. The two were known for stringing various robberies together. The public saw Bonnie and Clyde’s as dangerous outlaws and as “Robin Hood” like folk heroes. Their fame was increased by the fact that Bonnie was a woman, an unlikely criminal, and because the couple posed for playful photographs together, which were later found by police and released to the media.

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#8

In 1993, Andre the Giant dies. Andre was a professional wrestler who was 7 ft. and 4 in. tall and weighed 520 pounds. Andre’s massive size was due to a brain tumor that produced large amounts of a human growth hormone. The giant had a high alcohol tolerance, as he was able to drink 108 12 oz beers in one sitting. With the mixture of his tumor and unhealthy lifestyle, Andre died due to heart failure at 46 years old.

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#9

In 1979, sixteen year old Brenda Spencer shoots at a elementary school from her home. Spencer killed 2 men and wounded 9 kids, as she lived across the street from the school. The rifle that Spencer used was gifted to her for Christmas by her father. When asked why she committed the act, Spencer said “I just don’t like Mondays. I did this because it’s a way to cheer up the day. Nobody likes Mondays.” As of result, Spencer is currently serving two 25 year sentences.

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#10

In 2004, Shrek the Sheep is finally sheared. The sheep was hiding for 6 years from shearers because of his strong dislike of getting haircuts and was eventually found. The sheep’s fleece weighed a record 60 pounds at the time. The shearing was viewed by millions live on TV.

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#11

In 1992, Japan apologizes for forcing more than 200,000 Korean women to serve as sex slaves for Japanese soldiers during World War II. These women also known as “Comfort Women” were selected by Japanese who deceived Koreans. The Japanese saw Koreans as an inferior race and wanted to strip Koreans from their culture. The women were brutally forced to serve 40 to 50 men a day. Since, these women were the only source of comfort for soldiers they were in front of the line and many died from explosions, bullets, and suicide. After the war, life was difficult for the women as they were left stranded and many were unable to return home. Some were sent home when allied forces found them, but even when they were returned home their families were ashamed of the them and were abandoned.

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#12

In 1974, one of America’s most famous serial killers Ted Bundy strikes again. Bundy used his charm to pick up his young victims. When Bundy was finally recaptured in 1979 after escaping jail twice, he confessed to killing 36 people. However, some claim that he killed over 100 people. Eventually, in 1989 Bundy was executed.

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#13

In 1945, Soviet troops enter Auschwitz. The Soviets freed over 7,000 survivors of the concentration camps and as of result, they revealed to the world the horrors that occurred in the camps. During the existence of the camp over 1 million Jews were brutally murdered. Prior to the Soviets entrance, the Germans were aware that the Soviets were on their way and therefore they tried to cover their crimes by shooting sick prisoners and blowing up crematoria.

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#14

In 1926, famous magician and escape artist Harry Houdini dies from a poisoned appendix. Interestingly, two weeks prior to his death Houdini was giving a lecture and commented on how he has the ability to withstand blows. Moments after making the comment a student punched Houdini twice in the stomach. However, Houdini had no time to prepare. These blows ruptured Houdini’s appendix and the bacteria eventually poisoned his system. “Never try to fool children, they expect nothing, and therefore see everything...”-Harry Houdini

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#15

Before he became president, Abraham Lincoln was a dominant wrestler. Thanks to his long limbs, in approximately 300 matches Lincoln was only defeated once. Lincoln was known for talking trash in the ring and even challenged an entire crowd: “I’m the big buck of this lick. If any of you want to try it, come on and whet your horns.” At 21 years old, Lincoln was the wrestling champion of his county in Illinois. In 1992, Lincoln was honored in the National Wrestling Hall of Fame.

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#16

In 1942, news of Holocaust death camp killings becomes public for the first time. The news broke out almost 7 months after the extermination of Jews began. The genocide began in Chelmno, a death camp in Poland that used gas vans as the main source to achieve their goals. This was used because it was silent and invisible. The gas vans would end up killing 360,000 Jews.

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#17

In 1895, German scientist Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen becomes the first person to observe X-rays. This finding occurred accidentally as he was testing to see if cathode rays could pass through glass. He noticed a glow from a nearby chemically coated screen and labeled this an X-ray because of its unknown nature. Rontgen then learned that the X-ray can penetrate human skin but not higher density parts like a bone and can be photographed. This was a major finding in the medical world as doctors no longer needed to open a body to see inside the human body.

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#18

In 1865, slavery gets abolished in America. The 13th Amendment was adopted and ruled that “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude… shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” 246 years after the first shipment of slaves to Jamestown slavery was abolished. However, issues to overcome slavery was an issue for America for over a century with the Reconstruction era and African American civil rights movement in the 1950 and 60s.

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#19

In 1946, French fashion designer, Louis Reard invented the modern bikini for women. The word “bikini” came from the United States atomic bomb testing site, Bikini Atoll. Therefore, Reard wanted to make a fashion statement that was explosive just like an atomic bomb.

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#20

In 1942, Anne Frank and her parents hide in a secret apartment behind her father’s business to avoid being captured by the Nazis. In this hiding spot, Anne Frank wrote her diary which went on to become a best seller, that is translated in over 70 languages. Despite hiding for more than 2 years, the Nazis captured the family. However, Anne Frank’s diary was left behind.

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#21

In 1921, the Tulsa Race Massacre begins. One of America’s worst and least known incidents of racial violence. On May 30th, an African American man, Dick Rowland was riding in an elevator with a white woman. It is unclear as to what happened in the elevator, but it believed that the woman screamed and Rowland fled the scene. The police arrested Rowland the following day and began an investigation. The next day, a newspaper reported that Rowland would be lynched. This began a 2 day riot where the outnumbered African Americans had their businesses and homes burned in Greenwood, one of the few up and coming African American cities at the time. As of result, it is now believed that around 300 African Americans have died while 10 white people have died. Roughly 9,000 African Americans were left homeless and thousands were arrested.

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#22

Chinese foot binding began in the 10th century, as a way to impress the emperor in his favorite dance. Eventually, the tradition of foot binding spread and it was perceived as a sign of beauty and wealth. It was believed that in order to have a good marriage, girls from the age of 4 to 9 had to have their feet bound. Foot binding caused infections which rotted toes and foot deformity. In 1912, China banned the tradition.

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#23

In June 1944, 14-year-old George Stinney, was convicted and put to death by the electric chair for the murders of two girls ages 7 and 11. Stinney was questioned in a small room, alone – without his parents, without an attorney. Therefore, people believe Stinney was coerced into confessing the murders. Stinney was then rushed to trial and after a two-hour trial and a 10-minute jury deliberation, Stinney was convicted of murder and sentenced to die. Stinney became the youngest person in modern times to be put to death. 70 years after his death, Stinney was exonerated.

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#24

In 1936, the “Moon Maniac” is executed in a prison in New York. The “Moon Maniac” Albert Fish killed as many as 10 children and ate their remains. Fish was executed for the murder of a 10 year old girl. Six years after murdering the girl, Fish sent a letter to the girl’s mother and he explicitly wrote what he did to her daughter. Fish wrote things on how he killed the girl and how he ate her remains for 9 days.

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#25

In 1992, Whitney Houston’s hit song “I Will Always Love You” premiers. Many associate this song with Whitney Houston. However, the song is a cover of Dolly Parton’s song. Parton agreed to let Houston use it after she was asked by Kevin Costner who co starred “The Bodyguard” with Houston at the time. Parton then heard Houston’s version and was blown away. Houston ended up winning 10 Grammy awards for the song and Parton became a legitimate songwriter.

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#26

In 2012, 17 year old Trayvon Martin is shot and killed by the captain of the neighborhood patrol, George Zimmerman. Martin was on his way home from a convenience store and was spotted by Zimmerman who was patrolling the area after a series of break ins have occurred. Zimmerman was suspicious of Martin and contacted the police, who told him not to follow the man. Zimmerman disobeyed the order and moments later shot Martin. When the police arrived, Martin was dead and Zimmerman had a bloody nose and cuts on the back of his head. Zimmerman. Is es self defense as an excuse and as of result was found not guilty an a charge for second degree murder. In 2013, the city where the incident happened ruled that it is now forbidden for neighborhood watch volunteers to carry a gun and pursue suspects.

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#27

In 1980, John Lennon is killed. Lennon was entering his building and was shot by a crazed fan 4 times. Lennon is known for being a part of the Beatles, which is one of the most successful music groups of all time. He is also known for being outspoken on many topics such as protesting against the Vietnam war.

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#28

In 1971, John Emil List kills his entire family and disappears for 18 years. List was a Sunday school teacher who was perceived as a successful father. However, for no apparent reason List brutally killed his mother, wife, and 3 kids. List devised a plan so that it would take a while for someone to find the bodies by cancelling milk, newspaper, and the mail from being delivered to his house prior the the murder. After years of searching, law enforcement gave up on searching for List until an episode of “America’s Most Wanted” gave them a lead. One viewer stated that List was living under a false identity in Virginia. List was then caught in 1989 and charged for 5 live sentences. In 2008, List died in prison.

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#29

In 1920, the Prohibition Act begins. With the passing of the 18th Amendment, alcohol was no longer allowed to be sold, transported, or produced in the United States. This resulted in an increase in organized crime, bootlegging, and worsened drinking habits. Eventually in 1933, the 21st Amendment repealed the 18th amendment.

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#30

In 2002, the defense rests on the Andrea Yates trial. Yates confessed to killing her 5 children by drowning them in a bathtub. When the police arrived, she stated that she was saving her kids souls by killing them. During trial, Yates was found guilty and sentenced to life despite pleading for insanity. Interestingly, in 2005 the court reversed the decision because the expert witness used Dr. Park Dietz gave information to influence the jury. Therefore, in 2006 the court found Yates not guilty and since then she has been admitted to a mental hospital in Texas.

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#31

In 1770, Daniel Lambert is born. Lambert was once known as the fattest man in England and is the first man to make a living by displaying his weight as an exhibition. For his exhibition, Lambert became a celebrity in England. When Lambert passed away at 39 years old, he weighed around 730 pounds.

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#32

In 1994, rock icon, Kurt Cobain, commits suicide. The body was discovered three day later by an electrician. Cobain’s mental spiral began a month before his death, when he was in coma after mixing alcohol with a drug. A few weeks later, Cobain threatened to kill himself and this time Cobain checked into rehab. Cobain left rehab without telling anyone and returned home where he would eventually kill himself. In his suicide note he wrote, “better to burn out than to fade away.”

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#33

In the 17th and 18th century, boys usually 6 years old were purchased from their poverty stricken parents by a master sweep in England. These boys would become chimney sweeps. Children would climb up chimneys using their elbows, back, and knees. Unfortunately, some children would get stuck and never get out. Since kids were put in unnatural positions, their growth was stunted and they would suffer from lung problems, soreness, and Chimney Sweep Cancer. In 1864, Parliament passed the “Act for the Regulation of Chimney Sweepers” which ended the use of young boys to clean chimneys.

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#34

In 1952, the Great Smog of 1952 begins. The heavy smog began when residents burned coal to stay warm and with the mixture of smoke, soot, and sulfur dioxide from the industries and cars nearby caused a heavy smog that covered the city. The smog lasted for 5 days and killed more than 4,000 people. The high death totals occurred due to respiratory issues that it caused, as people had problems with breathing and were vomiting phlegm. Also, visibility was limited as there was no sunlight. When the smog finally blew away, the British government passed laws to stop residents from using coal to heat their homes.

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#35

In 1992, the first smartphone is released. IBM’s Simon launched at $899 and featured a 4.5 in LCD touch screen. The phone was ahead of its time as it could send and receive emails, faxes, and pages. The Simon went on to sell 50,000 units.

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#36

On this day in 2001, “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” premieres. This was the first movie of the best selling series written by J.K. Rowling. The books and movies were popular amongst both adults and kids as fans were captivated by Harry and his friends adventures in Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Rowling’s who was a financially struggling single mother when she wrote the first Harry Potter book became one of the wealthiest people in the entertainment industry. The seven books in the series went on to sell over 400 million copies and are translated in 60 languages.

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#37

In June 1871, 8’1 Anna Haining Swan and 7’9 Martin van Buren Bates became the tallest married couple ever. The two fell in love when they met each other as employees of a circus. After moving in to a custom made house, the two were unfortunately unable to have a healthy baby as their first child died in a few hours and their second child that weighed 23 pounds survived for 11 hours. Their second child has the record for being the heaviest baby. When Anna died in 1888, Martin ordered a statute of her from Europe.

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#38

In 1916, the greatest female sniper of all time, Lyudmila Pavlichenko is born. As a member of the Soviet Army during World War II, she killed 309 Nazis, earning the name “Lady Death.” The feared Germans offered Pavlichenko lots of chocolate and to make her German officer in exchange for her to switch sides. After declining, the Germans said “if we catch you, we will tear you into 309 pieces and scatter them to the winds!” The Germans were unsuccessful and in 1974 Pavlichenko passed due to a stroke.

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#39

In 1992, President George H.W. Bush vomits on Japan’s Prime Minister. Bush was invited for dinner by the Prime Minister. During dinner, Bush felt ill and and then fell to his side. Bush ended up vomiting on the lap of the Prime Minister. This incident became one of the most widely ridiculed moments against a president.

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#40

In 1999, two teenagers kill 13 people in Columbine High School. Prior to the incident the two killers, recorded videos stating what they would do and apologized to their parents for their actions. The two would both kill themselves after the shooting. Since this incident there has been an average of 10 school shootings a year in the US.

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#41

In 1985, the first Blockbuster opens. Blockbuster’s success was built around their offering of a wide variety of tapes. Other video stores at the time did not offer the amount of tapes that Blockbuster did. Eventually, Blockbuster became one of the biggest providers of in home movies and video games in the world. In the 2000s, Blockbuster started to have lots of competition as on demand services such as Netflix started to expand. At one point there were 8,000 Blockbuster stores in the world. Today, there is only 1 remaining. What memories do you have from your visits at Blockbuster?

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#42

In 1967, the Detroit riots begin. In what is considered as one of the bloodiest riots in U.S. history, as 43 people died and more than 1,400 people were injured. The weeklong riots stem from high levels of frustration and anger from African Americans by extreme poverty, racism and racial segregation, police brutality, and lack of economic and educational opportunities. After the police raided a party for Vietnam War veterans, violence broke out. Eventually, the National Guard was called to end the violence.

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#43

In 1950, fifties icon James Dean appears on his first acting job on a Pepsi commercial. Dean was paid $30 for his appearance. From this commercial, Dean caught the eyes of producers and his acting career blossomed. Eventually, Dean became an icon of the American youth and teenagers. In the prime of his career Dean passed away in a car accident.

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#44

In 1987, 18 month old Jessica McClure is rescued after being trapped for 58 hours in an abandoned well. The incident occurred when McClure was playing in her aunt’s backyard and fell in a 8 inch wide opening. The baby dropped 22 feet. For 2 and a half days, experts were strategizing ways to rescue the baby. As of result of this incident, McClure was hospitalized for more than a month and lost a toe to gangrene. Today, McClure lives a healthy life with a family of her own.

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#45

In June 2002, former football player Pat Tillman enlists in the U.S. Army. In the aftermath of 9/11, Tillman turned down a multi-million-dollar contract. Unfortunately, Tillman was killed in 2004. It was initially believed that Tillman and his unit were ambushed by enemy forces. Tillman was praised as a national hero. However, Tillman’s family learned his death was due to a friendly fire. Tillman’s parents publicly criticized the Army, saying they had been intentionally deceived by military officials who wanted to use Tillman as a patriotic poster boy.

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#46

In 2013, three women are rescued after they had been imprisoned by their abductor for many years. The abductor, Ariel Castro abducted the three women when they where 21,16, and 14. One of the rescuers was a 6 year old girl who was born by one of the women and was fathered by Castro. The women were lured in by Castro when he gave them a ride in his car. The women were tortured, sexually assaulted, locked up, and starved. Eventually, one of the women screamed for help and a neighbor broke down the door. A month after being sentenced to death, Castro hanged himself in his prison cell.

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#47

On this day in 2009, the “King of Pop” Michael Jackson dies. Jackson is known to be one of the most commercially successful and influential entertainers of all time. Unfortunately, at 50 years old, Jackson suffered from cardiac arrest caused by a fatal combination of drugs given to him by his personal doctor.What is your favorite Michael Jackson song?

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#48

On this day in 1968, the first 9-1-1 call is placed in the United States. As more people began having telephones in their homes, fire departments around the country wanted a simple number to be dialed in the need of an emergency. AT&T monopolized the phone lines in the United States at the time and came up with the number. The number 911 was decided because it was easy to remember and it was not designated as an area code. However, it took a while for the United States to adapt to the system as in 1987 only about 50% of the nation used the system.

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#49

On this day in 2004, the first legal same sex marriage is performed in Massachusetts. On November 2003, the state ruled that the ban on same sex marriage was unconstitutional. Eventually, same sex marriage became legal in all 50 states on June 26, 2015, when the Supreme Court ruled that states must issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples and recognize same-sex marriages performed in other jurisdictions.

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#50

On this day in 1972, the deadliest snow storm in history begins. The 7 day snow storm dropped 10 to 28 ft of snow on Iran. The snow buried thousands of people and two villages had no survivors. By the end of the storm, 200 villages were wiped off of the map and 4,000 people died.

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#51

On this day in 1953, the first edition of “Playboy” magazine is put on store shelves. The magazine featured Marilyn Monroe on the cover and promised full in color nudes of the famous model. Interestingly, the first edition is the only issue to not include a date and the famous Playboy Bunny on the cover, as the founder Hugh Hefner did not believe that there would be a second edition. The first issue sold out in weeks for 50 cents a copy. From using a $1,000 loan from his mother to fund his idea, Hefner built one of the most recognizable brands in the world.

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#52

In 1945, Adolf Hitler commits suicide. Since January of 1945, Hitler was hiding in his underground bunker after the Soviet Union’s siege of Berlin. The bunker had 18 rooms with electricity and water supply. The day before his death, Hitler married his long time mistress, Eva Braun. Hitler and his wife poisoned themselves and their dogs with cyanide capsules. Hitler then shot himself. The bodies of the two were cremated. However, when Soviets reached the chancellery, they removed Hitler’s ashes to prevent a memorial. 8 days later Germany surrendered.

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#53

In 1980, Paul McCartney is released from a Tokyo Jail. McCartney was in Japan as part of a tour with his band Wings. In the airport, McCartney had enough marijuana in his luggage to warrant a 7 year sentence in Japan. However, due to the double standard of being a famous artist, McCartney was released in 9 days. In an interview in 2004, McCartney said, “This stuff was too good to flush down the toilet, so I thought I’d take it with me.”

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#54

In 1889, the Eiffel Tower opens. The French government announced a design competition for a monument to honor 100 years since the French Revolution. Out of hundreds of designs, Gustavo Eiffel’s design was selected. Interestingly, he also designed the Statue of Liberty years prior. The 984 ft tall tower, caused one casualty which was reasonable for a project of this height. The Eiffel Tower was built with in 2 years and became the tallest structure until 1930 when the Chrysler Building was built in New York.

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#55

In 1981, Prince Charles announces his engagement to Princess Diana. The two met when Charles was 29 and Diana was 16. Diana’s sister was seen to be a match for Charles, but it did not workout between them. The two met again in 1980 and hit it off this time. After getting pressured by his father and 13 meetings later, the two got married. Unfortunately, after 11 years of marriage the two separated.

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#56

In 1971, John Lennon’s hit song “Imagine” is released. The song was influenced by Lennon’s wife Yoko Ono. The message that the song conveyed was for the end of the Vietnam War and a push for humanism. Overall, the song became Lennon’s most successful song and one of the most influential songs of the 20th century. Today, the song is associated with the Times Square Ball on New Year’s Eve in New York City, as the song played before every ball drop since 2006.

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#57

In 1993, famous actress Audrey Hepburn dies. Hepburn was discovered by a French writer who insisted that Hepburn should be in the broadway version of her novel. From there, Hepburns’s acting career blossomed. Hepburn is also known for her charity work as an ambassador for UNICEF, where she went around the world to help raise money for disadvantaged children. -“Nothing is impossible. The word itself says ‘I’m possible!’” - Audrey Hepburn

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#58

In 1887, Hellen Keller meets her teacher, Anne Sullivan. When Keller was 19 months old she lost her sight and hearing. Sullivan taught Keller techniques that led Keller to become a college graduate, lecturer, and activist. For this accomplishment, Sullivan became known as “the miracle worker.”

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#59

In 1964, The Beatles appear for this first time on live American Television on the Ed Sullivan Show. 73 million Americans were watching the historic moment. The major success of the appearance paved the way for other British rock groups which led to the “British Invasion.”

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#60

In 1967, Dr. James Bedford becomes the first person to be cryonically frozen. Before his death, Bedford agreed to have his body frozen at an attempt to have it revived. Although his body would probably not be able to be revived, Bedford’s body sets a goal for future science and medicine research.

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#61

In 1984, the first baboon to human heart transplant is performed. 2 week old “Baby Fae” had a defective heart where parts of the left side of the heart were missing. A few days after the baby’s birth, Dr. Bailey convinced the mother to try an experimental baboon heart transplant since Baby Fae’s chance of survival was close to none. Sadly, the transplant was not able to save the baby’s life as the baby passed away twenty days later.

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#62

In 2007, three year old Madeline McCann goes missing in Portugal. McCann and her family were vacationing. On the evening McCann went missing, her parents left to a bar while McCann and her 2 year old twin siblings were sleeping in their apartment. The parents would check on the kids every 30 minutes. McCann’s disappearance received widespread media coverage. The parents were even named as suspects, but they were later dropped. Madeline was never found.

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#63

In 2018, former United States Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar is sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for sexual assault. Nassar was found to abuse over 260 women and girls. This case showed the power of the #MeToo movement and was an example of how abusers can escape justice for decades.

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#64

In 1945, the US Army liberates Buchenwald concentration camp. When the Gestapo headquarters (Germany’s secret police), found out that Americans were close they ordered the camp administrators to blow up all the evidence of the camp including the inmates. However, they did not know that the administrators already fled out of fear. The camp held thousands of Jews. Many died from disease, malnutrition, executions, and were used as test subjects for vaccinations. Among those saved were famous author, Elie Wiesel.

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#65

In 1961, Princess Diana is born. During her marriage, the “People’s Princess” was president or patron of over 100 charities. The Princess publicized work on behalf of homeless and also disabled people, children and people with HIV/Aids. Princess Diana was also known for her renowned style and was closely associated with the fashion world, patronising and raising the profile of younger British designers.

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#66

In 1879, famous scientist Albert Einstein is born. Einstein is known for some of the most important theories in science and is considered as one of the smartest people of the 20th century. Einstein’s key contributions to science led to inventions such as the atomic bomb. --“Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.” - Albert Einstein

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#67

On this day in 1922, entrance to King Tut’s tomb is found. British archaeologist Howard Carter began to intensively search for the King’s tomb after most ancients tombs were claimed to be discovered. It took Carter several years to search the 4 room tomb. During his search, Carter found over thousands of artifacts. Carter’s most famous finding in the tomb was King Tut’s solid gold coffin, which has been preserved for over 3,000 years.

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#68

In 1994, hit TV show “Friends” premiers. The show propelled the careers of 6 relatively unknown actors at the time. It went on to air for 10 seasons and had one of the highest views for a finale at 50 million viewers. “Friends” is still popular today as the newer generation like to watch the show to remember a simpler time of friendship without social media. Netflix payed a whopping $80 million to allow “Friends” to be streamed on their platform for 2019. Who is your favorite “Friends” character?

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#69

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy gets assassinated. While being accompanied by his wife, the Governor of Texas and his wife in a convertible the president gets shot at 12:30 p.m. in the streets of Dallas, Texas. 30 minutes later the president was announced dead. The shooter Lee Harvey Oswald also killed a policeman who questioned him after the incident. Two days later Oswald was shot and killed. At 2:39 p.m. on the day of JFK’s death, Vice President Lyndon Johnson was sworn in as the next president.

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#70

In 2016, Harambe is killed to save a 3 year old child. The child spent 10 to 15 minutes alone with the gorilla after the boy fell into the gorilla exhibit. The killing of Harambe outraged many as people wanted the mother to face charges. Do you think Harambe should have been killed?

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#71

In 1966, Walt Disney dies. Disney is best known for pioneering cartoon films such as Mickey Mouse and for creating amusement parks like Disneyland and Disneyworld. For his contributions in the animated world he won 22 Oscar awards. -“All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them.” - Walt Disney

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#72

In 2001, “The Fast and the Furious” debuts in theaters. The movie was inspired by a 1998 article in “Vibe” magazine that was based on illegal racing. The movie was an unexpected hit, with the 9th installment being released soon.

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#73

In 1992, Cartoon Network premiers. With this debut, the network became the first 24 hr children’s channel and the first channel to be fully dedicated to animated shows. Cartoon Network has entertained people for over a quarter of a century all over the world. What show do you miss the most on Cartoon Network? (The clip is a rare recording of the launch of Cartoon Network)

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#74

In 1865, President Abraham Lincoln gets shot. While Lincoln and his wife were at a theater, the murderer, John Wilkes Booth shoots the President in the back of his head. Booth was able to escape with a horse. The assassination occurred five days after confederate leader, Robert E. Lee gave up. When Booth shot Lincoln he shouted "Sic semper tyrannis" which means "Thus always to tyrants.” Eventually, Booth was shot by soldiers in a barn where he refused to surrender.

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#75

In 1953, the structure for DNA is found. The founders Watson and Crick discovered that DNA was a spiral of two DNA strands. According to their findings, DNA replicated itself by separating into individual strands. This finding led to the development of pre natal screenings for disease genes, genetically engineered foods, treatments for diseases like aids, and accurate testing of physical evidence to convict criminals.

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#76

In 1874, former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill is born. Churchill is best known for successfully leading Britain in World War II. He is considered as one of the best British prime ministers of all time. For having such a high reputation, Churchill was given a state funeral in 1965. -“You have enemies? Good. It means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.” - Winston Churchill

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#77

In 1964, Muhammad Ali wins his first world title. At the age of 22, Ali made his famous line that he would “float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.” Ali said that he would knockout the champion in the eighth round, but failed to do as the champion’s corner gave up after the sixth. This win was one of the many reasons why Ali was one of the most influential athletes of the 20th century.

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#78

In 1960, popular American Fiction “To Kill a Mockingbird” is published. The novel is praised for its sensitive treatment of a child’s awakening to racism and prejudice in the American South. Have you read “To Kill a Mockingbird”?

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#79

In 1941, President Franklin Roosevelt declares the fourth Thursday of November as Thanksgiving Day. Celebrating Thanksgiving on Thursday began during the colony days of Plymouth and Massachusetts colonies. These colonies would celebrate post-harvest holidays on the weekday regularly. Eventually, Thanksgiving became recognized by congress and George Washington declared the 26th of November as the official day for the Thanksgiving of the US constitution. In 1863, President Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving as the last Thursday of November. Interestingly, In 1939 President FDR changed the date of Thanksgiving to the next to last Thursday of November. After this unpopular change, President FDR changed the date of thanksgiving back to the last Thursday of November.

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#80

In 1986, the space shuttle “Challenger” explodes after liftoff. The mission of the shuttle was to board the first United States civilian into space. The civilian, Christa McAuliffe was a high school teacher who won a competition to accomplish this feat. Unfortunately, all 7 of the passengers died, as the spacecraft exploded due to a technical difficulty because of the weather. Interestingly, prior to liftoff the mission was delayed 6 days due to weather conditions.

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#81

In 1925, Charlie Chaplin’s “The Gold Rush” debuts. Chaplin’s role as the Little Tramp is one of his most famous characters. After the premier of the movie, Chaplin said, “This is the picture I want to be remembered by.” For this role and many others, Chaplin was one of the most famous people in the world during the silent film era.

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#82

On this Wednesday, July 29 in 1981, Lady Diana Spencer placed the royal crown on her head for the first time. Prince Charles and Lady Diana exchanged their vows in the presence of Queen Elizabeth II, and a global tv audience of over 750 million people. A total of 27 cakes were crafted for the wedding. A slice of which was auctioned off in 2018 for $1,200. The young couple vowed themselves to each other for better or for worse however, destiny had something else in mind. Mutual affairs pushed the couple’s rocky marriage over the edge. Ultimately, the wedding cake lasted longer than the marriage.

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#83

On this day in 1913, Harriet Tubman passes away. Tubman is known for escaping slavery and for helping around 300 slaves escape via the Underground Railroad. Among those captured were Tubman’s parents and none of those that escaped were captured again. Due to her success in helping slaves escape, slave owners put a $40,000 reward to capture Tubman.

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#84

On this day in 1892, Francesca Rojas’ two young children are killed in their home. When Rojas returned home, she claimed to have seen a man named Velasquez escaping out her open door. Once inside, she found both her six-year-old boy and four-year-old girl stabbed to death. After being arrested and tortured for weeks, Velasquez continued to deny the murder. Eventually, investigators found a bloody fingerprint on a doorknob, and the print matched to Rojas. It is believed, Rojas killed her own children to improve her chance of marrying her boyfriend, who was known to dislike children. Rojas was sentenced to life.

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#85

On this day in 1475, famous renaissance artist Michelangelo is born. Michelangelo is best known for his sculptures, the Pieta, David and his painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. For these famous works, Michelangelo is considered as the greatest artist of his era.-- “The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it.” - Michelangelo

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#86

During the 1900s, rat-catchers were employed in Europe to control rat populations. This was practiced to prevent the spread of diseases and to prevent damage to food supplies. Despite the risk of being bitten or acquiring a disease from a rat, many rat-catchers would capture rats by hand. It has been said that some rat-catchers would raise their own rats to increase their compensation.

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#87

On this day in 2013, the Boston Marathon bombing occurs. The bombing killed 3 people and injured more than 260 people. Eventually, the authorities found that the bombing was executed by two brothers, who learned how to create the bomb from the internet. On the day that the two were found, the entire city was on lockdown, as people were advised to stay home. The older brother died during a shootout with the police and the other escaped in the middle of the scuffle. The younger brother was eventually caught and is currently spending life in prison.

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#88

On this day in 1967, Louis Washkansky receives the first human heart transplant. 53 year old Washkansky was on the verge of dying from chronicle heart disease. Washkansky recieved a heart from a 25 year old women who was fatally injured from a car accident. The surgeon Christiaan Barnard developed his technique from American researchers who successfully performed the first heart transplant on a dog in 1958. Barnard successfully performed the surgery and gave drugs to Washkansky to suppress his immune system and to keep his body from rejecting the heart. However, these drugs made Washkansky open to sickness. 18 days later Washkansky died from a double pneumonia.

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#89

On this day in 1945, famous singer Bob Marley is born. Marley was the first international superstar to emerge from the third world. Marley is best known for popularizing the reggae genre around the world. -“The truth is, everyone is going to hurt you. You just got to find the ones worth suffering for.” - Bob Marley

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#90

On this day in 2002, “Spider-Man,” becomes the first movie to top $100,000 in its opening weekend. Since Spider-Man’s creation in 1962, the comic had lots of praise. With the massive advertisement by Columbia pictures and the fact that superhero movies traditionally have done well in theaters, it was inevitable that the movie would have been a massive hit. The record broke again during the next two additions in the “Spider-Man” series.

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#91

On this day in 1940, famous actor and martial artist Bruce Lee is born. Lee is known for changing the film industry in Hong Kong and bringing Kung Fu into the west. Lee was an Asian movie star that was not able to watch his success in America, as he died one month before the release of his most popular movie “Enter the Dragon.” At the age of 32, Lee was announced dead because of a reaction to a painkiller. -“Mistakes are always forgivable, if one has the courage to admit them.” - Bruce Lee

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#92

On this day in 1998, famous singer and actor, Frank Sinatra dies. Sinatra was the first modern superstar of popular music, with an entertainment career spanning for more than 5 decades. Sinatra appeared in 58 films. Once his appeal started to fade in the late 1940s, Sinatra changed his style to a smooth swinger with a rougher singer style. By the late 1950s, he defined rough edge masculinity and was the epitome of show business.

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#93

On this day in 1957, The Little Rock Nine students were escorted by federal troops to integrate a high school. After the 1954, ruling of Brown vs. The Board of Education it marked the beginning of the end of segregation. However, this change took quite some time as black students still faced difficulty in attending school. On September 2, 1957, the governor of Arkansas ordered the state’s National Guard to block the entrance for the 9 students from entering the school. The governor claimed that this was for the protection of the students. Two days later, the federal judge ordered The Little Rock Nine to attend the school. However this time the 9 students were blocked by both a mob and the National Guard. After various attempts to block the students from attending the school, President Eisenhower got involved and federalized the National Guard and ordered the Army to enforce the 9 students to begin regular class attendance. The hate towards the students was still not over as they were harassed everyday by the white students.

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#94

On this day in 1582, William Shakespeare marries Anne Hathaway. Despite the age gap with Shakespeare being 18 and Hathaway being 26, the two went on to have 3 children with each other. At the time of the marriage, Hathaway was pregnant and due to social standards Shakespeare had no choice but to marry her. Regardless of the circumstances, the two went on to have a long relationship and are buried beside each other at the Holy Trinity Church in Stratford.

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#95

On this day in 1962, President John F. Kennedy announces that Soviet missile bases have been found in Cuba. The bases were in construction at the time of the speech. However, if they were built they would have been capable of destroying the major cities of the United States. Kennedy announced that he ordered a blockade around Cuba so that more lethal weapons would not be shipped over to Cuba. Soviet’s did not budge from the United States as they continued to build the bases. The Soviet’s finally agreed to stop building the missiles after the United States promised not to invade Cuba and agreed to remove their missiles that were targeted on the Soviet Union from Turkey.

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#96

During the British Industrial Revolution up until the 1940s, the human alarm clocks known as the knocker-ups would wake people up so that they would get to work on time. At a time when alarm clocks were not cheap or reliable, for a few pence a week the knocker-ups would bang a pole on people’s windows or blow on a rubber tube as a peashooter until they received confirmation that their client was up and moving.

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#97

In 2017, 15 year old Jordan Edwards is killed after a cop fires a rifle into a car. Jordan was sitting in the front passenger seat of a car filled with teenagers, as they were leaving a party. The cop, Roy Oliver and his partner were called in to a suburban home after people complained of underaged drinkers at a house party. As the two were speaking to the host of the party they hear gun shots. The two then ran out and Oliver grabbed a rifle as his partner went to the gunfire. His partner stopped a car and Oliver suspected that they were driving off. Oliver then shoots and hits Jordan in the back of his head. When asked, Oliver’s partner said he never felt that he was in danger. Oliver was then fired and was found guilty of murder Oliver was sentenced to 15 years in prison. Do you think 15 years is right for the murder of Jordan Edwards?

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#98

On this day in 2018, a Thai soccer team gets trapped in a cave. The coach of the team takes his team, to explore a cave, intending to stay just about an hour. But a monsoon hit while they are underground and the cave’s entrance floods, the coach and his 12 players, ages 11-16, become trapped. The team would remain stuck underground for more than two weeks. The team survived by drinking fresh water that dripped from a cave stalactite. Everyone on the team was rescued. However, a rescuer died while attempting to give an oxygen tank to the boys.

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#99

On this day in 1953, Soviet leader Joseph Stalin dies. Stalin is known for his reign of terror, as he would kill or put people in labor camps that went against his beliefs. It is believed Stalin caused the death of over 20 million people. Stalin is also known for fighting off the Germans in World War II after they turned on him and for starting the Cold War.

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#100

On this day in 1865, the American Civil War ends. The general of the last Confederate Army west of Mississippi signed the surrender terms offered by the Union. With this signing, came a formal ending to the bloodiest 4 years in U.S. history. More than 620,000 lives were lost in the war.

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#101

On this day in 1881, Francisco “Chico” Forster gets shot to death by his 18 year old lover Lastania Abarta. 40 year old Forster, was a wealthy bachelor who was known to mistreat women. On March 14th, the two met in a pool hall and Forster promised to marry Abarta. However, Forster disappeared and Abarta and her sister were scattering the city looking for him. When Abarta finally found Forster, she shot him through his eye. Forster’s dad then sued Abarta and Abarta’s lawyers used female hysteria as a defense. At the time, it was believed that females could be driven crazy by their reproductive systems. As of result, Abarta got away with murder.

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#102

On this day in 2016, the Orlando nightclub shooting occurs. A total of 49 people were dead, while dozens were injured. At the time, this was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. After officers finally stormed in the building, they shot and killed the shooter. It is unclear if this was an act of terrorism or a hate crime against homosexuals. However, the shooter has had a history of being interviewed by the FBI for affiliations with ISIS.

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#103

On this day in 1932, famous actress Elizabeth Taylor is born. Taylor was best known for her roles in various popular movies and her eyes. In the film “Cleopatra,” she became the first actress to get paid $1 million for a role. Interestingly in 1987, Taylor was the first celebrity to create her own line of perfume, which has had a revenue of $1 billion worldwide.

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#104

On this day in 1952, KFC opens its first restaurant. Harland Sanders began working in the food industry when he was 40 years old. Sanders served southern dishes at a gas station in which he later converted into a restaurant. In 1939, Sanders found that frying chicken with his 11 herbs and spices in a pressure cooker is exactly what he has been looking for. Sanders had achieved great success with his chicken and was named Colonel (highest title of honor a state can give) by the governor of Kentucky. From here Sanders tried to dress his part with his iconic white suit. -In the 50s, Sanders began to sell his chicken to restaurants in exchange for a royalty. In this decade an interstate bypassed his restaurant and he lost business. As of result, Sanders sold his restaurant with a loss. Despite being in his 60s, Sanders did not retire and instead moved out to open the first official KFC. He eventually sold the rights to his franchise in 1965 for $2 million. Today, there are over 4,000 KFC restaurants around the world.

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#105

On this day in 1941, Pearl Harbor gets bombed. Although the United States did expect a probable attack by Japan. The United States was caught by surprise by the Japanese. The Japanese attacked the US because they were seeking to expand in Asia and they feared that the US Navy base in Hawaii would cause them issues. Therefore, Japan thought that if they would destroy the US warships then they would not attack back. As of result of this attack, over 2,500 Americans died and number of American war equipment were destroyed. However, the next day the US declared for war and entered World War II.

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#106

Before photo filters, taking photos with actors dressed as polar bears was the craze in Germany. The craze began when polar bears were brought to the Berlin Zoo in the 1920s, which led to a fashionable trend. A collector of vintage photos, Jean-Marie Donat has been collecting these bizarre photos for over 25 years.

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#107

On this day in 1960, the FDA approves the world’s first commercially produced birth control pill. The development of the pill was initially commissioned by Margaret Sanger, who opened the first birth control clinic in the US in 1916. She hoped to find a development of a more practical alternative to contraceptives that were used at the time. In the 1950s, a biochemist, Gregory Pincus and a gynecologist, John Rock created the pill that had synthetic progesterone and estrogen to repress ovulation in women.

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#108

On this day in 1901, Annie Edson Taylor becomes the first person to successfully plunge over Niagara Falls. Taylor, 63 years old at the time of the stunt wanted to gain fame and money. Therefore with the help of two men, Taylor strapped herself into a leather harness inside a five foot high pickle barrel. Inside the barrel was padding with cushions. Her two helpers towed her to the middle of Niagara Falls and cut her loose. Taylor received the fame that she wanted, but not the money that she wished for.

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#109

On this day in 1997, Princess Diana dies in a car crash. The Princess and her boyfriend Dodi Fayed were on their way to Dodi’s apartment. When they entered the car, a group of paparazzi on motorcycles tailed their car and a few minutes later the driver of their vehicle lost control and crashed into a pillar. The three died in the accident. It was later revealed that the driver was heavily intoxicated. “Carry out a random act of kindness, with no expectation of reward, safe in the knowledge that one day someone might do the same for you.” - Princess Diana

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#110

On this day in 1953, Dr. Jonas Salk announces the polio vaccine. In 1952, an epidemic year 58,000 cases were reported in the United States with more than 3,000 deaths from polio. The common treatments for the disease were an “iron lung” and quarantine. Polio is a disease that affects the nervous system and as of result caused paralysis. Eventually polio cases in the US dropped because of the vaccine and today there are only a few cases in the US.

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#111

On this day in 1963, Alcatraz prison closes. Alcatraz is known as one of America’s harshest and inescapable prisons. A total of 36 inmates have tried to escape the prison, 23 were recaptured, 6 were shot to death, and the rest were presumed drowned. The prison can be visited today as it is open for tourism.

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#112

Meet Ota Benga, a teenage boy brought from central Africa and displayed like an animal at the Bronx Zoo in New York City, New York. Benga was born into the Mbuti Pygmy colony, which was colonized by Belgium a little after his birth. In 1904, Benga was freed by an American missionary, who was assigned to bring back pygmies to be part of a human exhibition at the 1904 St. Louis fair. With the popularity of Benga at the fair, Verner took Benga to the Bronx Zoo where he was initially hired to help with the animals.  Zoo officials however began to exhibit him in the Monkey House where again he attracted large crowds. A group of black New York clergymen led by Rev. James H. Gordon, demanded that he be freed. By the end of 1906, 23-year-old Benga was released to the custody of Rev. Gordon who placed him in the New York City’s Howard Colored Orphan Asylum.

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#113

Between 1854 and 1929 the United States was engaged in rescuing poor and homeless children, the Orphan Train Movement. These Orphan Trains moved approximately 200,000 children from cities like New York and Boston to the American West to be adopted. Many of these children were placed with parents who loved and cared for them; however others always felt out of place and some were even mistreated. As state and local governments became more involved in supporting families, the use of the Orphan Trains was no longer needed.

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#114

Meet Tsutomu Yamaguchi, the man who survived two atomic bombs. On August 6, 1945, Yamaguchi was on his way to work when suddenly the sky erupted in a blaze of light. He had just enough time to dive into a ditch before an ear-splitting boom rang out. The shock wave that accompanied it sucked Yamaguchi from the ground, spun him in the air like a tornado and sent him hurtling into a nearby potato patch. 3 days later Yamaguchi dragged himself out of bed to report to work. This time he had a meeting in Nagasaki where another bomb dropped. Yamaguchi’s double-dose of radiation took its toll. His hair fell out, the wounds on his arms turned gangrenous, and he began vomiting incessantly. Yamaguchi passed away in 2010 at 93 years old.

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#115

On this day in 2001, famous singer Aaliyah died in a plane crash. Besides rocking the tomboy look and the side part, Aaliyah is known for her smooth vocals over hip-hop beats, which helped usher R&B into the mainstream. In addition, Aaliyah was one of the few R&B artists who danced in her music videos. Unfortunately, the 90s icon died at 22 years old. Her style has influenced many artists over the years.

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#116

In 1929, Martin Luther King Jr. is born. King helped organized the Montgomery Bus Boycott which was the first successful major protest of the African-American civil rights movement. With the influence of Gandhi, King used civil disobedience and nonviolent resistance to segregation in the south. - “If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.” - Martin Luther King Jr.

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#117

In 1998, popular film “Titanic” becomes the first film to gross over $1 billion. In just 74 days the movie accomplished this feat. Since then, a total of 45 other films have grossed over $1 billion.

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#118

In 1901, Queen Victoria dies. The Queen’s 63 year reign was the longest in British history until 2016. This reign is also known as the Victorian era. In this era, the British Empire evolved industrially, scientifically, politically, and culturally. In addition, the British Empire expanded to Asia and Africa.

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#119

In 1998, President Bill Clinton gets impeached. Clinton became the second president to get impeached after a 14 hr debate between the House of Representatives. The ruling charged Clinton with lying under oath in front of a grand jury for denying his affair with 21 year old intern Monica Lewinsky. Despite the impeachment, Clinton was still able to finish off his term as he was acquitted on both articles of impeachment.

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#120

In 1810, famous composer, Beethoven composes one of his most famous pieces, “Fur Elise.” It is believed that the song was dedicated to Theresa Malfatti, a woman who he proposed to. Others believe that the song was dedicated to Elizabeth Rockel, a woman who Beethoven wanted to marry. Nonetheless, this famous work was composed when Beethoven was nearly deaf and did not receive the recognition it deserved until it was published posthumously in 1865.

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